Compare ISA Charges (Funds)

Typically, your annual charge depends on whether you hold funds or shares in your investment ISA. Here, we assume you will invest in funds only. If you plan to invest in shares, have a look at our shares' comparison tables.

We have split the ISA providers into three categories based on the level of help they will offer you. These categories are: Do It Yourself (DIY), Do It With Me (DIWM), and Do It For Me (DIFM). For each provider we list, your money is protected by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS). This means you could get your money back up to £85,000 if any of the companies goes bust. Use the tabs below to learn about each category and to compare providers.

If you have questions, please ask the community.

This is ideal for people who know what they are doing. With DIY platforms, you'll have access to a wide range of investments, and in some cases, investment ideas or suggested fund lists. But you have to choose your investments and build your portfolio yourself. These require a bit of research on your part, so it is crucial you know what you are doing. It would help if you have clear goals, know your risk appetite and understand how to build a portfolio.

When you invest in a fund, please note the fund manager will add various charges within the fund. We haven't included any fund management fees here, just platform and dealing fees. If you would like a rough idea of how fund management fees could impact the total amount you pay to a platform, have a look at the 'Do It With Me' and 'Do It For Me' tabs. Additionally, you can find out more about investing in funds and the various charges in our Investing in Funds guide.

Important:
The table below shows annual charges of several investment platforms when you invest in funds as follows:

  • £100 per month regular payment
  • £500 per month regular payment
  • £1,000 per month regular payment
  • £20,000 lump sum (your year’s ISA allowance)
  • £100,000 lump sum (if you already have lots of ISAs from previous years and are transferring in)

For regular payments, we assume you'll make 12 deals a year or one deal every month. For lump sums, we assume you'll make four deals a year. A deal is either one of buying or selling an investment. It is also called a trade. We've used the colour red to indicate what platforms are more expensive compared to the others. This means the darker the shade of red, the more expensive the platform. Dark red doesn't mean bad or too expensive. It just means the platform is more expensive when compared to the others. If you would like to see a breakdown of fees charged by each platform, have a look at our Platform Charges Directory.

Finally, it is important to let you know we show the costs which apply to the first year only. This is especially important because, with platforms like iWeb, your charges reduce after the first year. Whereas with platforms like EQi, your charges might increase after the first year. You'll find all the details you need below.

Notes

  1. EQi - You'll pay no custody fee in the first two quarters of the year you join, so it'll be more expensive in subsequent years.
  2. IWeb - Charges a one-off account opening fee of £25 in the first year, so it will be cheaper in subsequent years where you do not have to pay the account opening fee.

Once again, you can find more information on the various charges here and view our share dealing ISA charges comparison table here.

This is ideal for people who are happy making their own investment decisions but require a bit of help getting there. The DIWM platforms do not give you advice but offer some guidance that could help you understand your attitude to risk, and then provide ready-made investments that match your risk level.

When you invest in a fund, please note the fund manager will add on various charges within the fund. A good representation of those charges is the OCF or Ongoing Charges Figure. It is an estimate of the portion of the total cost of your investment that goes to the fund manager and is separate from the platform fee and dealing fee. The examples in the table below should give you a good idea of your investment's total cost, including OCF, platform fees, and dealing fees in the first year only. In each case, we've used a mid-risk ready-made portfolio or multi-asset fund. You can find out more about investing in funds and the various charges in our Investing in Funds guide.

Important:
The table below shows annual charges of several investment platforms when you invest in funds as follows:

  • £100 per month regular payment
  • £1,000 per month regular payment
  • £20,000 lump sum (your year’s ISA allowance)

For regular payments, we assume you'll make 12 deals a year or one deal every month. For the lump sum, we assume you'll make one deal a year. A deal is either one of buying or selling an investment. It is also called a trade. We've used the colour red to indicate what platforms are more expensive compared to the others. This means the darker the shade of red, the more expensive the platform or offering. Dark red doesn't mean bad or too expensive. It just means the platform is more expensive when compared to the others. If you would like to see a breakdown of fees charged by each platform, have a look at our Platform Charges Directory.

Notes

  1. AJ Bell and Barclays are the only members of the 'Do It With Me' cohort that charge fund dealing fees. This partially explains why they have some of the highest costs for regular investments above.

Most of the platforms with low OCFs offer just index trackers and ETFs, so don't get too excited about the cheaper offerings. Except you are interested in only trackers and ETFs, then please get excited. Remember, you can find more information on the various charges here and view our share dealing ISA charges comparison table here.

This is ideal for people who are either beginners or who want all the hard work done for them. With DIFM platforms, you'll often be presented with a limited set of investment choices based on your attitude to risk, investment goals and how much you plan to invest. DIFM platforms are mostly robo-advisers. Depending on the platform you choose, you may have access to formal financial advice.

When you invest in a fund, please note the fund manager will add on various charges within the fund. A good representation of those charges is the OCF or Ongoing Charges Figure. It is an estimate of the portion of the total cost of your investment that goes to the fund manager and is separate from the platform fee and dealing fee. The examples in the table below should give you an idea of the total cost of your investment, including platform fees, dealing fees, OCF, and transaction costs (where we could find them). In each case, we've used a mid-risk ready-made portfolio or multi-asset fund. You can find out more about investing in funds and the various charges in our Investing in Funds guide.

Important:
The table below shows annual charges of several investment platforms when you invest in funds as follows:

  • £100 per month regular payment
  • £1,000 per month regular payment
  • £20,000 lump sum (your year’s ISA allowance)
  • £100,000 lump sum (if you already have lots of ISAs from previous years and are transferring in)

For regular payments, we assume you'll make 12 deals a year or one deal every month. For lump sums, we assume you'll make one deal a year. A deal is either one of buying or selling an investment. It is also called a trade. We've used the colour red to indicate what platforms are more expensive compared to the others. This means the darker the shade of red, the more expensive the platform. Dark red doesn't mean bad or too expensive. It just means the platform is more expensive when compared to the others. If you would like to see a breakdown of fees charged by each platform, have a look at our Platform Charges Directory.

Finally, it is important to let you know we show the costs which apply to the first year only. This is especially important because, with platforms like Santander, Wealth Horizon and Munnypot, your costs significantly reduce after the first year. You'll find all the details you need below.

Notes

  1. EQ Investors - Minimum investment of £1,000 lump sum or £250 per month regular payment
  2. Moneyfarm - Minimum investment of £5,000 lump sum or £1,500 regular direct debit
  3. Munnypot, Santander and Wealth Horizon all charge a one-off initial advice fee in the first year, so they will be cheaper in subsequent years where you do not have to pay this fee.
  4. Netwealth - Minimum investment of £50,000.

Most of the platforms in this category offer just index trackers and ETFs. That's why their OCF is quite low. Remember, you can find more information on the various charges here and view our share dealing ISA charges comparison table here.

One more thing...

Important❗️
We are not regulated to give you financial advice, so we kindly ask that you not take the information on our website, online community or social media pages as advice. If you think you will need someone qualified to help you make financial decisions such as what to invest in, we strongly recommend you seek advice from a suitably qualified financial adviser. There are a few websites where you can find advisers. Have a look at Unbiased or VouchedFor.

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Credits 🙌
The Lang Cat
The contents of this page were inspired by The Lang Cat's Guide to ISA Pricing and Guide to ISA investing.

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